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HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b: three new transiting super-Jupiters from the HATSouth project

Author(s): Bento, J; Schmidt, B; Hartman, JD; Bakos, Gaspar Aron; Ciceri, S; et al

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Abstract: We report the discovery of three moderately high-mass transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b. These planets add to the number of known planets in the ∼2MJ regime. HATS-22b is a 2.74 ± 0.11 MJ mass and 0.953+0.048 −0.029 RJ radius planet orbiting a V = 13.455 ± 0.040 sub-solar mass (M∗ = 0.759 ± 0.019 M ; R∗ = 0.759 ± 0.019 R ) K-dwarf host star on an eccentric (e = 0.079 ± 0.026) orbit. This planet’s high planet-to-stellar mass ratio is further evidence that migration mechanisms for hot Jupiters may rely on exciting orbital eccentricities that bring the planets closer to their parent stars followed by tidal circularization. HATS-23b is a 1.478 ± 0.080 MJ mass and 1.69 ± 0.24 RJ radius planet on a grazing orbit around a V = 13.901 ± 0.010 G-dwarf with properties very similar to those of the Sun (M∗ = 1.115 ± 0.054; R∗ = 1.145 ± 0.070). HATS24b orbits a moderately bright V = 12.830 ± 0.010 F-dwarf star (M∗ = 1.218 ± 0.036 M ; R = 1.194+0.066 −0.041 R ). This planet has a mass of 2.39+0.21 −0.12 MJ and an inflated radius of 1.516+0.085 −0.065 RJ.
Publication Date: Jun-2017
Electronic Publication Date: 28-Feb-2017
Citation: Bento, J, Schmidt, B, Hartman, JD, Bakos, GÁ, Ciceri, S, Brahm, R, Bayliss, D, Espinoza, N, Zhou, G, Rabus, M, Bhatti, W, Penev, K, Csubry, Z, Jordán, A, Mancini, L, Henning, T, de Val-Borro, M, Tinney, CG, Wright, DJ, Durkan, S, Suc, V, Noyes, R, Lázár, J, Papp, I, Sári, P. (2017). HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b: three new transiting super-Jupiters from the HATSouth project. \mnras, 468 (835 - 848. doi:10.1093/mnras/stx500
DOI: doi:10.1093/mnras/stx500
Pages: 835 - 848
Type of Material: Journal Article
Journal/Proceeding Title: MNRAS
Version: Final published version. This is an open access article.



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