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HATS-43b, HATS-44b, HATS-45b, and HATS-46b: Four Short-period Transiting Giant Planets in the Neptune-Jupiter Mass Range

Author(s): Brahm, R; Hartman, JD; Jordán, A; Bakos, Gaspar Aron; Espinoza, N; et al

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Abstract: We report the discovery of four short-period extrasolar planets transiting moderately bright stars from photometric measurements of the HATSouth network coupled to additional spectroscopic and photometric follow-up observations. While the planet masses range from 0.26 to 0.90 MJ, the radii are all approximately a Jupiter radii, resulting in a wide range of bulk densities. The orbital period of the planets ranges from 2.7 days to 4.7 days, with HATS-43b having an orbit that appears to be marginally non-circular (e = 0.173 ± 0.089). HATS-44 is notable for having a high metallicity ([ ] Fe H = 0.320 ± 0.071). The host stars spectral types range from late F to early K, and all of them are moderately bright (13.3 < V < 14.4), allowing the execution of future detailed follow-up observations. HATS-43b and HATS-46b, with expected transmission signals of 2350 ppm and 1500 ppm, respectively, are particularly well suited targets for atmospheric characterization via transmission spectroscopy.
Publication Date: Mar-2018
Electronic Publication Date: 14-Feb-2018
Citation: Brahm, R, Hartman, JD, Jordán, A, Bakos, GÁ, Espinoza, N, Rabus, M, Bhatti, W, Penev, K, Sarkis, P, Suc, V, Csubry, Z, Bayliss, D, Bento, J, Zhou, G, Mancini, L, Henning, T, Ciceri, S, de Val-Borro, M, Shectman, S, Crane, JD, Arriagada, P, Butler, P, Teske, J, Thompson, I, Osip, D, Díaz, M, Schmidt, B, Lázár, J, Papp, I, Sári, P. (2018). HATS-43b, HATS-44b, HATS-45b, and HATS-46b: Four Short-period Transiting Giant Planets in the Neptune-Jupiter Mass Range. \aj, 155 (112 - 112. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa898
DOI: doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa898
Type of Material: Journal Article
Journal/Proceeding Title: Astronomical Journal
Version: Final published version. This is an open access article.



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