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The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK). II. Analysis of Seven Viable Satellite-hosting Planet Candidates

Author(s): Kipping, DM; Hartman, J; Buchhave, LA; Schmitt, AR; Bakos, Gaspar Aron; et al

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Abstract: From the list of 2321 transiting planet candidates announced by the Kepler Mission, we select seven targets with favorable properties for the capacity to dynamically maintain an exomoon and present a detectable signal. These seven candidates were identified through our automatic target selection (TSA) algorithm and target selection prioritization (TSP) filtering, whereby we excluded systems exhibiting significant time-correlated noise and focused on those with a single transiting planet candidate of radius less than 6R⊕. We find no compelling evidence for an exomoon around any of the seven Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) but constrain the satellite-to-planet mass ratios for each. For four of the seven KOIs, we estimate a 95% upper quantile ofMS/MP < 0.04, which given the radii of the candidates, likely probes down to sub-Earth masses.We also derive precise transit times and durations for each candidate and find no evidence for dynamical variations in any of the KOIs. With just a few systems analyzed thus far in the ongoing “Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler” (HEK) project, projections on η would be premature, but a high frequency of large moons around Super-Earths/Mini-Neptunes would appear to be incommensurable with our results so far.
Publication Date: 20-Jun-2013
Electronic Publication Date: 30-May-2013
Citation: Kipping, DM, Hartman, J, Buchhave, LA, Schmitt, AR, Bakos, GÁ, Nesvorný, D. (2013). The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK). II. Analysis of Seven Viable Satellite-hosting Planet Candidates. \apj, 770 (101 - 101. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/770/2/101
DOI: doi:10.1088/0004-637X/770/2/101
Type of Material: Journal Article
Journal/Proceeding Title: Astrophysical Journal
Version: Final published version. This is an open access article.



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